• Planning the Joint Retirement Portfolio: Currently, It’s A Mess

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    For those of you keeping track (and who isn’t?), this is the second step of our Planning the Joint Portfolio series. Here’s step 1 if you missed it.

    A few weekends ago we went through the process of writing down all of our retirement investments down in one place. As our net worth statement says, we currently have our retirement funds spread across four accounts: my SIMPLE IRA, my Roth IRA, Her 401(k), and Her Roth IRA. The investment holdings in all of our accounts are as follows:

    FundTicker% of Portfolio
    TOTAL100%
    Roth IRA (Vanguard)
    AmerenAEE1.42%
    BoeingBA0.76%
    General MotorsGM1.06%
    Northern TrustNTRS1.56%
    PrologisPLD1.57%
    Vanguard Prime Money Market Fund (Cash)VMMXX1.05%
    TOTAL PERCENTAGE OF PORTFOLIO ASSETS7.42%
    Roth IRA (Fidelity)
    Advanced Micro DevicesAMD2.59%
    CVS CorporationCVS3.94%
    General ElectricGE7.11%
    Northern TrustNTRS2.59%
    PfizerPFE2.20%
    Aston/TAMRO Small Cap NATASX7.52%
    Fidelity Cash Reserves (Cash)FDRXX1.54%
    TOTAL PERCENTAGE OF PORTFOLIO ASSETS27.49%
    401(k)
    AllianceBernstein International Value Fund (A)ABIAX16.74%
    Dreyfus Premier S&P STARS Opportunity Fund (R)DSORX9.84%
    Fidelity Advisor Small Cap Fund (T)FSCTX9.31%
    Neuberger Berman Socially Responsive Fund (Investor)NBSRX4.15%
    TOTAL PERCENTAGE OF PORTFOLIO ASSETS40.04%
    SIMPLE IRA
    John Handcock Lifestyle Growth Fund (C)JCLGX21.19%
    Cash Reserves (Cash)-3.85%
    TOTAL PERCENTAGE OF PORTFOLIO ASSETS25.05%

    Running our total retirement investments into the Morningstar X-Ray tool yields this additional information about our overall portfolio:

    xray1.gif
    xray2.gif

    You can see here that as for our total investment we are pretty much all in stocks, with the only exposure to bonds being primarily in JCLGX. In our stock holdings, we are weighted very heavily in large cap stocks. A lot of that is due to our individual stock exposure. All of those stocks were bought when we were in college and didn’t know much about investing. While we knew little about Roth IRAs at the time, we did know that it was a relatively safe place to try and learn about investing.

    After looking at the damage we realize that we have much to work on. The next post in this series will tackle how much risk we want to take on to get where we want to go.

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